Friday, August 23, 2013

The Interfaith Identity Crisis

About a week ago, the Washington Post argued the nature of interfaith endeavours has shifted with demographics. A more diverse population means interaction between religious groups is no longer restricted to the clergy. In fact, a typical practitioner can now be expected to have some sort of contact with persons of different faiths.

Children who grow up and go to college or university today have very different experiences than their parents. Interfaith used to be something people did. Now it is something people live daily. Though there now exist twice as many interfaith groups in the United States than a decade ago, making the generational transition has been difficult for many. Old assumptions are being challenged, and questions of new priorities must be raised.

In a Huffington Post article, Rev. Donald Heckman, Executive Director of Religions for Peace USA, suggests the interfaith movement must rebrand itself. The term means too many things to too many people to convey anything definite to the wider public. In response to a growing number of persons who do not identify with any particular religious tradition, he says,
'I think we may need to cede the term "interfaith" to the small but growing number of people who see faith, religion and spirituality as boundary-less enterprises of exploration and who allow for multiple affiliations. And the more narrow technical term "interreligious" needs to be co-opted to cover the broad arc of things that are multi-, inter- and intra- for -faith, -religious and - spiritual.'
But is problem really just about branding? If it's about religion, doesn't it go a whole lot deeper than the question of what a person calls themselves?

Heckman is asking the right questions. The way he is asking them, however, leaves something to be desired. The deepest motivation of the interfaith movement has always been to bring people together. And that makes the wisdom of more carefully parsing the names we apply to ourselves doubtful.

The problems the interfaith movement presently faces are perennial problems, which have taken on new forms in a new context. Seen in that light, answers to questions about how to move forward should become more obvious.

The basic problem has always been how one engages persons of other faiths while remaining true to one's own faith. How can I both be a Buddhist, Christian, Hindu, Jew, Muslim, etc. and engage constructively with persons of other faiths?

There seems an assumption, especially in certain Evangelical Christian communities, the logic of religious identity is ironclad: one can be either this or that, but not both. And the only reason to talk to members of other faiths is to convert them.

Rather than rebranding, the interfaith movement should be retooling. Since more and more people are living the interfaith movement on a daily basis, what is needed more than ever is to equip and teach people to find inspiration for interfaith engagement within their particular religious traditions.

I don't mean glossy presentations of the things religions share in common, though that must be a part of it. I mean encouraging Christians to think on what it means to see everyone as being created in the image of God, Muslims what it means to be Allah's representatives on earth, Hindus as jivas, and so on.

Our religious traditions, without exception, classically wrestled with the dignity and misery of being human. They set out to achieve the impossible goal of reconciling the entire human race to each other. They also cautioned against presuming too much about one's own abilities to accomplish that goal. The labels we gave ourselves, in this picture, matter a whole lot less than actual flesh and blood.

The interfaith movement needs to see itself not as a solution to a problem everyone else has. If that were the case, then rebranding is all that's needed. The interfaith movement needs rather to see itself as taking part in the very thing people have been working at for many millenia. Only then will it catch up to the truth that people are living interfaith lives every single day.

No comments: